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22/12/14
Parents' mental health helpline loses its grant - YoungMinds charity seeks crowdfunding donors to save advice service

A vital helpline offered by the UK's leading children's mental health charity is facing closure after the Government cut its budget.

The YoungMinds Parents' Helpline, which offers free support to adults concerned about the mental health of a child or young person, has existed for more than 20 years but could be forced to close as soon as April if its funding targets are not reached.YoungMinds has launched a crowdfunding campaign to save the service. It hopes to raise £20,000 from the public before Christmas Day but it needs £500,000 to keep the helpline running. The charity has so far raised around £200,000 through charitable donations and community fundraising.
The parents' helpline is run by 19 professional advisers, four full-time staff and 30 volunteers. It answers around 10,000 calls from concerned adults every year, but YoungMinds says it is unable to cope with recent increases in demand. Since September the number of calls to the helpline has more than doubled from around 2,000 to 4,500.

For the past few years YoungMinds has received substantial funding from the Department for Education, but it has been told this money is no longer available due to government budget cuts.

Lucie Russell, the charity's director of campaigns, said YoungMinds was currently able to answer only about 30 per cent of the calls it received from parents, because the helpline was "running on very reduced budgets and experiencing unprecedented demand".

"The calls have been going up so fast we wouldn't be able to keep up the number of staff. If we invested in more staff and volunteers that would mean we would be able to answer more calls and respond at a higher rate," she said. "This is about helping families in distress before the problem becomes a crisis. The helpline is there because mental health is in crisis anyway."

Sarah Brennan, the chief executive of YoungMinds, said the Parents Helpline acted as a vital bridge between families and mental health services. "Often the parents, when they are given guidance, find that is enough for them," she said. "There is such a confusion about what the services are and parents are desperate for help."

The charity has been told it must apply for further government grants through the £25m National Prospectus Grants Programme but Ms Brennan said there was no guarantee it would be successful. "Hundreds of organisations will have applied for funding and it is an open competition," she said. "Even if we are successful we might not get all of [the money]. There's no guarantee."

A spokesman for the Department for Education said: "YoungMinds is one of several projects that received one-off family support funding for two years from 2013 to 2015, to provide for some of our most vulnerable people and their families. We are now considering applications for a new £25m wave of grants that will fund a wider range of voluntary sector projects from April 2015. For the first time this programme will include a specific focus on mental health projects in recognition of the vital services they provide." [The Independent. 21.12.14]

To help the advice line, go to www.youngminds.org.uk
16/12/14
The news last week regarding boys self- harming increase is I hope something that we can all use as a reminder to incorporate into our daily lives - boys need to be able to talk to friends, famiies and teachers about their worries and problems and we can support them by creating an environment where getting open, honest and vulnerable is the norm' no matter what age or gender one may be.Self-harm hospital admissions among children 'at five-year high'

12.12.14 BBC Radio 4:

The number of children being admitted to hospital in England for self-harm is at a five-year high, figures show.

Admissions of girls aged 10-14 increased by almost 93% - from 3,090 in 2009/10 to 5,953 in 2013/14 - with a rise of 45% in boys, from 454 to 659.

Campaigners say the figures could be the tip of the iceberg and "huge numbers" of children - especially boys - were still "suffering in silence".

The government says £30m will be put into mental health care in A&E units.

Experts told the BBC that increases in admissions were partly due to a rise in young people self-harming, but also reflected better recording of data by hospitals.

They said a cultural shift was needed in society to ensure teachers and parents were not afraid to address the topic of self-harm among boys.
'Unable to come forward'

They also said the figures represented the tip of the iceberg because boys often did not like to admit to self-harming because it was mostly perceived as a female behavioural problem.

Boys were also more likely than girls to punch or hit themselves, which some hospitals may not categorise as self-harm, campaigners added.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre statistics showed 659 boys aged 10 to 14 were admitted to hospital in 2013/14, compared with 577 in 2012/13 and 454 in 2009/10.

Matthew Everett, 24, began self-harming when he was 11. He said that earlier this year he was cutting himself "every night".

"Before I would go to bed I would cut myself and then I would go to sleep. Then, the next day, I would do the same just to get that same release to feel I was in control still," he said.

Although figures for 10- to 14-year-old girls were much higher, Rachel Welch - project director of the website selfharm.co.uk - said society must not assume boys did not self-harm.
She said: "Because of the way society has constructed the image of self-harm, it makes it much easier for girls to come forward and ask for help.

"We've actually got a huge number of boys who are suffering in silence, unable to come forward and ask for help because they're struggling with something perceived to be something that only affects girls."

Ms Welch said self-harming had been a problem for a while in children, but that it was previously recognised as "bad or aggressive behaviour".

She also believed children were likely to be influenced by what they saw on the internet and in the family home.

"There is some research that suggests children are more likely to engage in self-harm if they have witnessed it elsewhere," she said.

"For example in older siblings, parents, friends or online - particularly if they perceive it to have had a positive outcome like getting more attention or care."
line
02/12/14
A picture-perfect nose job: how the selfie is boosting demand for plastic surgery.

In the quest for the perfect selfie, some folks seem to have decided that no photo-editing app to is good enough to smooth out the wrinkles: nothing less than old-school plastic surgery will do.

An annual study released earlier this year by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery showed that one in three surveyed doctors have seen an increase in requests for surgery due to patients’ dissatisfaction with their image on social media. As a result, the report says, American surgeons saw a 10% increase in rhinoplasty from 2012 to 2013, a 7% rise in hair transplants, and 6% in eyelid surgery.

Doctors say patients come to them with selfies they took to show where they think they need improvement. Some surgeons point out that with the selfie’s characteristically distorted angle, it does not provide an accurate representation of one’s face. “I refuse a significant proportion of patients with selfies because I believe it is not a real image of what they actually look like in person,” Dr. Sam Rizk, a Manhattan-based plastic surgeon told Reuters.

Many of the requests come from a generation increasingly defined by social media. Over half of the surgeons surveyed saw a rise in procedures performed on patients under 30, a sign of the impact of platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat on the falling self-esteem of the young.

A fresh face for your selfie isn’t the only reason the Instagram-obsessed visit the plastic surgeon. Elle reported earlier this year that with the now-obligatory social media engagement announcement, women are getting hand lifts—yes, hand lifts—to “appropriately” show off their wedding bling. Dr. Ariel Ostad, a New York dermatologist told the magazine that he has seen a 40% increase in the procedure, which smoothes out the skin on the fingers, since the advent of social media.

Another fix for the Internet generation? Patients with constant computer-face come in to get their “tech necks” done—getting rid of the wrinkles on the neck caused by leaning into their screens 24/7.

For your future selfie endeavors, some words of caution. The perfect selfie may come with a hefty price-tag from the plastic surgeon, but if you are striving for that extra arm’s length with a “selfie stick,” it could also land you in jail. [Quartz. 30.11.14]
Photo: A picture-perfect nose job: how the selfie is boosting demand for plastic surgery. In the quest for the perfect selfie, some folks seem to have decided that no photo-editing app to is good enough to smooth out the wrinkles: nothing less than old-school plastic surgery will do. An annual study released earlier this year by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery showed that one in three surveyed doctors have seen an increase in requests for surgery due to patients’ dissatisfaction with their image on social media. As a result, the report says, American surgeons saw a 10% increase in rhinoplasty from 2012 to 2013, a 7% rise in hair transplants, and 6% in eyelid surgery. Doctors say patients come to them with selfies they took to show where they think they need improvement. Some surgeons point out that with the selfie’s characteristically distorted angle, it does not provide an accurate representation of one’s face. “I refuse a significant proportion of patients with selfies because I believe it is not a real image of what they actually look like in person,” Dr. Sam Rizk, a Manhattan-based plastic surgeon told Reuters. Many of the requests come from a generation increasingly defined by social media. Over half of the surgeons surveyed saw a rise in procedures performed on patients under 30, a sign of the impact of platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat on the falling self-esteem of the young. A fresh face for your selfie isn’t the only reason the Instagram-obsessed visit the plastic surgeon. Elle reported earlier this year that with the now-obligatory social media engagement announcement, women are getting hand lifts—yes, hand lifts—to “appropriately” show off their wedding bling. Dr. Ariel Ostad, a New York dermatologist told the magazine that he has seen a 40% increase in the procedure, which smoothes out the skin on the fingers, since the advent of social media. Another fix for the Internet generation? Patients with constant computer-face come in to get their “tech necks” done—getting rid of the wrinkles on the neck caused by leaning into their screens 24/7. For your future selfie endeavors, some words of caution. The perfect selfie may come with a hefty price-tag from the plastic surgeon, but if you are striving for that extra arm’s length with a “selfie stick,” it could also land you in jail. [Quartz. 30.11.14]
17/11/14
Cyber- bullying...Make sure you include this during Anti-bullying week, this week. If you are one of the schools who is nervous about teaching this contact me. I offer bespoke sessions for young people of all ages, staff and parents. Check out my other website pages to find out more and read my testimonials.

One piece of feedback from a parent: "Probably the most valuable 2 hours I have ever spent! My children learnt alot from Kate in school and now we will continue to talk about E-Safety as a family. Talk was concise, entertaining, professional and at my level!"

 

In the news today: MP says schools are failing on cyberbullying.

The chairman of the Commons education select committee says schools in England are failing in their efforts to teach children about the dangers of online abuse and trolling.

Earlier this year, the Department for Education issued new statutory guidance for all schools and colleges in England on how to keep children safe online.

Graham Stuart's committee is looking into whether the guidance is adequate.

The government says it has taken measures to tackle online abuse...

A YouGov survey in September of just over 700 teachers suggested two-thirds had seen pupils abusing and bullying each other on the internet.

Just over 40% said they had never taught e-safety, while a third said they would feel out of their depth tackling it in class.

[For the full story see BBC News. 17.11.14] 
10/11/14
Janet Palmer HMI (National Lead for PSHEeducation) stresses the contribution PSHEeducation can make to Ofsted success and the crucial role of citizenship education and concludes:

“It is clear from the new inspection guidance that the evidence schools provide regarding the effectiveness of their PSHEeducation, citizenship education and pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is crucial to the judgments inspectors make regarding leadership, management, behaviour, safety, safeguarding, the curriculum, and ultimately, the overall effectiveness of the school.” [PSHE Association. 10.11.14]

https://pshe-association.org.uk/blogs_entry.aspx?id=48&dm_i=HSS,2YG5D,CD...